20 Reasons Why You Should Invest in Portugal

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Lisboa-seguro-viagem-portugal

20 Reasons Why You Should Invest in Portugal

Category : Portugal

Lisboa-seguro-viagem-portugal

Did you know that purchasing property in Portugal could enable you and your family to become Portuguese citizens? This is one of many reasons why an investment here could be a very wise decision.

So, if you’ve been considering relocating your family or making that investment in a holiday home, retirement home or a home you can rent out for extra income, you should really consider Portugal. The reasons are overwhelming:

  1. A Portuguese passport for the whole family. Our top reason for investing in Portugal has to be the fact that if the head of the household qualifies for residency, all dependents automatically qualify without any additional costs.
  2. A secure property market. Possibly the most important reason you would want to invest is that Portugal has a proven and secure property market with an average property growth of 15% per annum over the last 15 years. Not too shabby.
  3. High rental income. Rental yield in Portugal on average remains one of the highest in Europe – you could rent your house out a good few weeks of the year and even more if it is in a prime spot like Cascais.
  4. It’s a peaceful place. According to the 2015 Global Peace Index rankings, Portugal is the 16th most peaceful country in the world, boasting one of the lowest crime rates in Europe. In fact, Lisbon was recently voted the safest capital city in Europe.
  5. One word: golf. Portugal is undoubtedly one of the world’s top golfing destinations, with more than 50 world-class golf courses already built or under construction and many more in the planning phase. If you enjoy the sport, there is probably nowhere else in the world that caters better to your golfing needs.
  6. Sport is big. You can also enjoy many other sports, including most water sports, horse riding and even skiing in the north.
  7. Open space rather than crowds. Portugal has one of the lowest population-to-land densities in Europe, so even the major cities are not overcrowded and there is plenty of open space for all to enjoy.
  8. It cares about its environment. For many years, Portugal has seen a trend towards the development of the country’s renewable resource industry. It has considerable wind and river power resources, the two most cost-effective renewable resources.
  9. Relaxed immigration rules. Portuguese residents can also choose to live and work almost anywhere in Western Europe or Brazil, and can visit most countries without any restrictions.
  10. A low cost of living. Living costs, including food, drinks, gas, electricity, water and transport, are relatively low compared to most other European cities.
  11. The climate is unbeatable. Expect long, hot summer days cooled by the Atlantic breeze, and extremely pleasant winters. Short bursts of rain ensure that the landscape stays lush and green.
  12. A solid public transport system. Getting around the country is easy and pleasant, as public transport by road or rail is safe, reliable and affordable.
  13. Unspoilt countryside – both now and in the future. The Portuguese Government enforce strict planning regulations to ensure the beaches and countryside remain unspoilt – so you can be sure your investment won’t be tainted by hundreds of developments springing up around you.
  14. Life is good. Portugal has a wonderful laid-back culture of enjoying “the simple things in life” – good food, good wine, good company, sport, leisure, and plenty of natural beauty.
  15. High living standards. The life is good in Portugal is a fact! Lisbon has climbed four places in terms of living standards, according to the Mercer 2011 Quality of Living Survey, placing it above cities like Milan, Tokyo, Rome and Madrid.
  16. Internal flights are cost-effective. With flight times of less than three hours, a great choice of airports and low-cost airlines, the whole of Portugal is close, easy to reach, and affordable.
  17. A not-so-difficult language. Portuguese is not that difficult to learn. And once you’ve mastered it, Spanish and Italian will be a breeze!
  18. Easy, quick access to and from Europe. From Portugal, the rest of Southern and Central Europe are super accessible, so you can explore even more. And friends and family in the UK will have no problem coming to visit you as often as you want them to.
  19. No language barriers. Many Portuguese residents speak English, so you won’t have to struggle with language barriers.
  20. A place to call home. And finally – the Portuguese people are truly friendly and hospitable. You will feel welcome and “at home” if you decide to make Portugal your second or even your only home!

Interested? Contact us!
Office. +351 21 485 75 10
Mobile. +351 96 174 9562 /+351 96 707 0005

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World Corporate Golf Challenge Final in Cascais

Category : Events

WCGC_social_2016

World Corporate Golf Challenge (WCGC) Final, for the second year running, will be held in Cascais, Portugal, from 21 June – 26 June 2016. Players and guests from over 50 countries will be able to enjoy the many delights that this wonderful coastal town has to offer.

The World Corporate Golf Challenge represents one of the biggest corporate golf tournaments in the world. Since its inception in 1993 WCGC has grown to such an extent that over one million golfers have taken part in more than fifty countries. The 2016 World Final represents a fantastic opportunity for players to represent their company and country against other corporates from around the world. Participating in the World Final is an experience of a lifetime. Last year’s World Final was held for the first time in Portugal, and the WCGC organising committee is thrilled to once again be bringing the event back to Cascais.

Cascais is a must-see destination for any visitor to Portugal. Offering beautiful beaches that range from sheltered coves to miles of dune-backed sands, visitors can immerse themselves in a variety of quaint villages, unparalleled history, and unspoiled forests. A former small fishing village that was regularly frequented by the Portuguese monarchy during the 19th century, nowadays Cascais is a lively and cosmopolitan town that still preserves a great deal of its earlier aristocratic atmosphere.

Carlos Carreiras – Mayor of Cascais

“Cascais is truly happy to welcome the World Corporate Golf Challenge for the second time in a row. We hope (and we are, again, seriously working for it) that all participants will enjoy their time in Cascais. A place you already know is much more than a premium venue for golfers. As we like to put it, this is simply the best place to live a day, a week or a lifetime. Be most welcome and may everybody join us in our town: Cascais.”

Jose Guerra – Chairman of WCGC

“We are delighted to once again bring the World Final to the spectacular Lisbon Coast and in particular Cascais. The 2015 World Final was a huge success thanks to the fantastic support from our Host Destination, Cascais, as well as our other sponsors and partners. We look forward to working with them once again in 2016. I am certain that the World Corporate Golf Challenge will provide a great platform to continue showing what Cascais has to offer to the global corporate golfing audience.”

Harry Lloyd –Event Director at WCGC

“I am extremely excited to be working with Cascais, as we look to produce yet another memorable World Final. Cascais is an extremely special place and we look forward to showing this to the competitors and guests in attendance, as well as the watching world, in 2016.”

Source: worldcorporategolfchallenge.com

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Cascais hosts Longines Global Champions Tour 2016

scott_sga1002The lively coastal town of Cascais, plays host to the Longines Global Champions Tour and Global Champions League for the 11th year running, from the 7th – 9th July 2016. The wonderful parkland of Cascais is transformed for two days of high-calibre show jumping which last year saw two-time Champion Scott Brash take top honors in the Grand Prix once again – his third win of the season.

Estoril has grown into a renowned international destination for world-class sport, hosting the America’s Cup sailing, golf, tennis, surfing and motorsports. Blessed with a fine climate most of the year, visitors flock to the coast to soak up the sun and enjoy the great landscape and attractions. One of Estoril’s biggest draws is the beautiful sandy bay of Praia de Tamariz.

Cascais became the summer destination of choice for Portuguese nobility in the 1900s – it has since become a lively international beach resort. Down the road, Estoril’s famous casino is thought to be where Ian Fleming came up with the idea for Casino Royale, as he stalked Yugoslav double agent Dusko Popov at its tables.

In Portugal there are palaces, museums and national parks to visit and the capital city, Lisbon, is only a short distance away with its top-class hotels, restaurants and bars. The Grand Prix of Cascais, Estoril is sure to be an exciting event, as riders fight for supremacy in the overall 2015 Championship Ranking.

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Why Lisbon is Europe´s coolest city right now

Lisbon

LISBON GLOWS. YOU WALK ON LIGHT. This isn’t a figure of speech. It’s a matter of fact, of science. The seven hills on which the city sits form a vast natural amphitheatre that collects and reflects light. This amphitheatre is open at one end, where it meets the broad estuary of the Tagus, which acts as a huge mirror, reflecting still more light. The pale stone buildings, many painted yellow, pink or ochre, send the light bouncing around the hills; innumerable windows redirect it into the deepest and narrowest of alleys, so that even the shadows seem radiant, reverberant. Above, the prevailing northerly winds disperse clouds and increase visibility. Below, the intricately patterned limestone pavements, calçada portuguesa, cause the light to rise from the ground as well as from the water.

It’s the combination of these various factors – geographical, topographical, material and meteorological – that give Lisbon its otherworldly luminosity and make it unique among European cities.

The attitude here is different too. You find none of Berlin’s angst or Paris’s hauteur or Rome’s braggadocio. Instead, a modesty that borders on reticence, a wistful humour tinged with melancholy. (Note that the less-than-modest and not obviously reticent José Mourinho, perhaps the most famous living Portuguese outside Portugal, is from Setúbal, not Lisbon, and should be understood as exceptional in any case.) You see it in people’s eyes and hear it in their music, their poetry. The word saudade is sometimes mentioned in this connection. It’s impossible to translate. It refers to a bittersweet kind of longing, although it can also refer to a premonition of future loss, nostalgia for something that hasn’t happened yet. The loss may be personal – lost love, most likely – or collective – an apprehension of the distant but unforgotten glory of the nation as a whole.

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Distant but unforgotten glory is something of a Portuguese speciality. The explorers who set sail from Lisbon during the Age of Discovery – principally during the 15th and 16th centuries – were among the greatest seafarers the world has ever known. ‘O mar sem fim é português,’ as Fernando Pessoa splendidly put it: ‘The endless sea is Portuguese.’ And so, for a while, it was – along with all the spoils that the endless sea afforded. If you’re curious about what that order of imperial success could buy, pay a visit to the Jerónimos Monastery, where Vasco da Gama is buried among mad stony flourishes in the Manueline style; or to the Chapel of St John the Baptist in the Church of São Roque, a baroque hymn in marble, amethyst, alabaster, ivory, porphyry and lapis lazuli, and reputedly the most expensive – not to say ostentatious – chapel ever constructed.
This was a very high point from which to fall. And in Lisbon’s case, the fall, when it came, was dreadful. The Great Earthquake of 1755 reduced 80 per cent of the city to rubble. The shock was felt as far away as Brazil. The terrible fires that followed were extinguished by a tsunami. Afterwards the Portuguese king refused to live within stone walls. He moved into a tent while his prime minister, the Marquess of Pombal, rebuilt the capital in a style widely admired by architects for its resistance to seismic disturbance and by everybody else for its exquisite, pared-down elegance.

Lately Portugal has entered a second Age of Discovery – only this time the traffic is flowing in the opposite direction, as travellers from all corners of the globe make their way over land and sea to discover Portugal, and Lisbon in particular.

90592626When I first came to Lisbon in my late teens I was struck not so much by the light as by the lettering. Lisbon is a living museum of fonts, a safari park of typographic styles, in paint, in neon, etched in glass, carved in stone, on signs and storefronts and trams, everywhere. The country’s political and economic difficulties during the 20th and early 21st century – dictatorship followed by the doldrums followed by near-bankruptcy – meant that, commercially, little changed at street level. The international names didn’t come, or not until very recently. So Lisbon isn’t a ‘branded’ city in the way we’ve become used to. The quirky, the independent, the family-run is still the norm, not yet the exception. The writing that was on the wall 20, 50, 100 years ago is still on the wall. ‘Reading’ Lisbon is one of the delights of spending time here, even if you don’t speak the language.

Hence the sense you get of drifting effortlessly through layers of history. This impression isn’t limited to one part of the city. You feel it wherever you go. Suppose you were to pause for a moment to refresh yourself with a sip of ginjinha, a cherry liqueur, at one of the atmospheric, hole-in-the-wall bars around Rossio station that dispense the stuff (and nothing else) for about a euro a shot. Having greeted the nonagenarian regulars and sprightly bartender – a whippersnapper in his sixties – you might find yourself glancing across the street at the entrance to a hip new graphic-design studio or hi-tech start-up outfit. Doing your best not to turn an ankle on the ginjinha-cherry stones that have been cast like so many ball bearings onto the footpath outside, you might step further into the street and extend your gaze towards the nearby square, which is dominated by a towering statue of Dom Pedro IV. (Though some say it actually represents Emperor Maximilian of Mexico, who looked a little like Pedro. Maximilian was executed by firing squad soon after the statue was completed; no longer needed, it was supposedly sold on to Lisbon at a knock-down price.) It’s overlooked from a hilltop by a severe scowl of Moorish fortifications, which were built over existing Roman ramparts. Which were erected on the site where, some 3,000 years ago, pre-Celtic peoples – the forebears, no doubt, of the cherry-stone-chuckers whom you greeted at the ginjinha bar just a few minutes ago – pitched their rudimentary encampments.

Lisbon is like that. I once met the claimant to the Portuguese throne. Portugal became a republic in 1910 but Dom Duarte continues to fly the flag for the House of Bragança, which had ruled until then. With his proud bearing and well-tended moustache, he reminded me of William Faulkner. With his polite but firm insistence on his family’s role in the life of the nation, he reminded me, too, of Faulkner’s observation that, to certain people in certain places, the past is never dead – it’s not even past.

Be that as it may, there is plenty happening in the present. New bars, restaurants, boutiques, clubs, galleries and hotels are multiplying at a dizzying rate. Parts of town that five or 10 years ago were no-go areas, or at least areas to which you had no obvious reason to go, have been reclaimed and reinvented. The entire city is thronging with visitors bearing pleasantly baffled expressions that seem to say: ‘Awesome. Who knew?’

Which must, I suppose, be an odd spectacle for those old enough to remember the lean years when nobody paid Lisbon any attention at all. During my most recent visit this past summer I popped into a shop called A Vida Portuguesa, which sells traditional bits and bobs. I commented on the tremendous charm of the place and then suggested that this must be something that only a foreigner would say. The assistant corrected me. No, she said. Elderly Portuguese who have heard about the shop will sometimes burst into tears of joy at the sight of simple things – a particular kind of toothpaste, a certain style of ruled exercise book – that they remember from their childhood but thought had ceased to exist. Saudade sorted.

I’ve been coming to Lisbon for nearly a quarter of a century. I honestly don’t know what took the rest of the world so long. I can’t think of another city that more richly deserves the attention. Long may Lisbon’s moment last. Long may it see its extraordinary beauty mirrored in the eyes of others. Long may it rejoice, in its own modest way, in its own inimitable glow.

Source: Condé Nast Travel

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Advice for buying property in Portugal

Migrating to for instance Cascais in Portugal is a dream for many. Portugal has a comfortable climate, the living costs are lower than in other European countries and it has a great vibe/culture. Moving to Portugal is very simple but it is important to prepare yourself well and ideally to have some contacts in place that can advise you. Over the following pages we try to cover all the important basics you should take into account. Also, A fair bit of helpful information can be found on the website of the Portuguese immigration office: Serviço de Estrangeiros e Fronteiras.

Buying a villa in Portugal

What you can expect from buying a house in Portugal depends mainly on the region and location. Do you prefer a house in the city or in the countryside. Should it be more inland or right at the coast?

Villas at the coast

The most expensive area’s for buying a villa or apartment are the coastal towns. Buying a house in a popular region for foreigners such as the algarve is significantly more expensive. This is due to the amount of foreigners that have moved here over the last decades. The Cascais region is certainly not a cheap region either. In this region the prices are based on a combination of factors such as distance to Lisbon. The region is very popular with both locals and foreigners.

Houses in Portuguese cities

The main portuguese cities such as Lisbon, Faro and Porto mainly consist of apartments. The houses you find in these cities are usually located in the suburbs or are small and expensive.
Apartments are available in all price categories and is mainly influenced by the location of the property. A large number of apartments have a balcony or roof terrace.

Villa’s in the countryside

The cheapest houses can be found in the Portuguese countryside. There are plenty large houses for sale for a reasonable price. These houses are usually located far from the main cities and coast.

Real estate agents in Portugal

The sale of houses are mainly done through real-estate agents in Portugal. Like in every country there are good and bad agents and a bad experience can also happen to a local. It is important to deal with an agent with whom you connect well. There is a significant difference between the efficiency of agencies. If an agents does not show significant interest it is recommended to look for another one.

There are various ways to find a decent real-estate agent in Portugal. Often people find an agent through an agent in their own country that is affiliated to an agency in Portugal. Also many Portuguese real estate agencies advertise in your country. Most of these are specialized in the more popular regions and have employees that speak English and other languages. We at Cascais Villa can help you with finding the right agent and/or property. Even Though we are specialized in the Cascais region, we have good contacts throughout Portugal.

Important: If you make use of a foreign agent, confirm and reconfirm the price and verify whether the property is still for sale before traveling to Portugal for a viewing.

Qualifications of Portuguese real estate agents

Portuguese real estate agents are monitored by the government. They must possess a licence called “mediador autorizado”. The agent must have proof of this licence. Usually this licence will be prominently displayed. If you do not see it, ask to make sure the real estate agent has it. It’s recommended to choose an agent connected to one of the recognized associations such as:
de Associação de Mediadores Imobiliários (AMI), Sociedade de Mediação Imobiliária of de Associação dos Mediadores do Algarve (AMA).

Fees for the real estate agency

The incurring fees for the selling real estate agents are usually between 5% and 10% but are included in the sales price. Meaning the costs are paid by the party selling the property.

Protection of the agency fees

Portuguese real estate agents can ask you to sign a document before showing you the property. This is to secure his commission in case you want to buy the property and so you will not go for the same property through another agent.

It is custom to schedule a viewing in advance. It is in most cases not possible to arrange a viewing ad hoc.
Viewing at the cost of a real estate agent

Many agents organize viewing trips for foreigners with a reduced rate for the accommodation during the trip. Once you decided to buy the property they usually reimburse the costs of the trip. Make sure you do not base your decision on this principle and the costs incurred to the agent for organizing. In the end the decision should be the right one for you.

Buying a house in Portugal

Buying a house consists of three phases. The process starts with the orientation, followed by the subrogation and is completed with the negotiation.

Orientation

When you start looking for real estate agents, it’s important to clearly indicate for what you are looking. The following points address some key questions:
– Do you want to live in the house parttime or fulltime?
– Would like to rent it out?
– In what region should the house be located
– What kind of property are you looking for: villa, appartment, nr of rooms etc.
– What is your budget

Once this is clear, you run through all property that matches your criteria and turn it into a short-list for viewings.

Subrogation

It is important to understand a Portuguese law called subrogation, meaning that debts such as mortgage, taxes and shared expenses are included in the property. So when buying a house these debts are included. To prevent this from happening to you, you will need an experienced lawyer.

When buying a house in portugal, it’s recommended to have a real estate agent that is registered with the Portuguese law as ‘mediador autorizado’. Also hire a descent property lawyer in your own country who can do the necessary checks.

To ensure there are no debts linked to the property you need to acquire a certidão de registro from the local registry. It is important to register the certificate (escritura) shortly after signing the deal because it is possible that between purchase and completion debts are transferred to the property.

Negotiation

The negotiation phase starts with an offer from the buyer. The seller will come with a counter offer or accepts your offer directly. Once both parties have come to an agreement, talks can be started about extra costs for the movable goods. When buying the property you are ought to request a fiscal number and to sign a temporary contract. Next, a down payment must be made and an independent lawyer will be involved to complete the sale.
Once the balance payment has been made, the official contract of purchase can be signed with the solicitor, who will provide the registration in the land register.

Pitfalls of buying a property

There are various potential pitfalls when buying a house in Portugal. Unfortunately there are plenty of stories about people and bodies who profited of ignorant foreign investors. The most important advice is to hire an independent lawyer who speaks both your language and Portuguese fluently and who is familiar with the Portuguese laws and affairs.

Situations you want to avoid when buying a house in Portugal:
– Buying a house without constitutional rights
– Buying an illegally built house
– Outstanding mortgages
– Properties sold with overdue utility bills
– Buying a property that is being sold to multiple buyers at the same time
Letting your property

There are two ways for letting your villa. You can either do it yourself or hire an agent.

The agent is a person or company who lets your property. They will ensure that tenants receive the keys upon arrival and arrange the cleaning afterwards. Often extra services are offered such as maintenance and repairs. On average an agency charges 25% of the rental rate.

It is recommended to ask various agencies, located close to the property, for a tender. Once you have found a potential agency, try to find some references. Also check whether they handle the reservations for you, their forecasted occupancy rate and how payments are structured.

It is also possible to work with a tour operator who lists your property in their registry. Tour Operators generally ask for a higher percentage but they are more likely to achieve a high occupancy rate.

Property tax (fixed assets) in Portugal

People who own fixed assets in Portugal must pay an annual property tax called contribuição autárquica/CA. If you rent out the property you are allowed to pass on the costs. The level of property tax depends on the value of the fixed asset. This is called “valor tributavel” and is based on the tax register. In these calculations, market value, location and some other factors are taking into account. You will receive this statement annually and most be paid in halves.

There are three levels of property tax.
Municipal: ~1% – highest rate
Rural: ~0.8% – lowest rate
Medial

Advice for viewings

Good preparation is key for an effective viewing trip. Below you can find a checklist of points to take into account when going for a viewing in Portugal.
– Create an agenda with daily viewings, do not plan more than 3 per day.
– Rent a car in advance to easily travel to each property.
– Make a list of phone numbers of contacts that may come in hand.
– Note down the addresses of each property you are going to visit.
– Have a clear overview of the requirements a property should meet.

When you are on your way to the property take a good look at the neighbourhood. Ideally the agent could share some information about the area. Often the agent also wants to show you other properties. If he is pushing to much for a certain property be aware that this may be because he can earn more on that specific deal. Once arrived at the property let your common sense be in charge.

In case you would like to make an offer immediately bring the following with you:
– Passport / ID
– Tax assessment of the past year
– Money for a potential deposit (€3000 – € 6000)
– Payslips
– Overview of financial liabilities

Overview of costs that occur when buying a villa in Portugal

There are many additional costs when you buy a house. Here we sum the most important costs you should take into account. Firstly, you need to know the fiscal value of the property, because most of the additional costs are based on this number. The fiscal value is usually lower than the market value of the property:
– Stamp duty
– Value added tax for new properties
– Solicitor fees
– Legal fees
– Land registration certificate
– Surveyor costs
– Real Estate agency fees
– Mortgage costs

Most of the taxes are paid by the buyer and can in some case already be included in the sales price. It is important to know which costs are included and which ones not.

Stamp duty (IMT)

When you buy a property in Portugal, a stamp duty must be paid. The stamp duty is paid to the municipality.and is called IMT. IMT is calculated over the total price of purchase, which is stated in the sales contract. The IMT must be paid before signing the land registration certificate. In portugal one is exempted from IMT up to € 92.407. There are fixed tables for IMT up to € 574.323. Above € 574.323, the IMT has a flat rate of 6.0%, plots in cities without remains of ruins 6.5% and rustic property 5.0%.

Basic tax (VAT in Portuguese IVA)

When buying newly built property in Portugal, one must pay a tax rate (IVA) of 19%. This percentage must be included in the advert price and agreed sales price. Meaning the price you see is the price you get.

Solicitor fees

The compensation paid for the solicitor is set by law. This fee used to depend on the price of sales. A new legislation introduced a system where one pays approximately €153 per transaction, plus €1.25 for each amendment or additional clause.

Legal Fees

The legal fees for buying a property in Portugal are generally between 1% – 2 % of the purchase price. The exact amount is dependent on the amount of work needed when buying the property. Usually the minimum charged legal fee is €1000,-

Land registration certificate

The occurring costs for the land registration certificate are generally between 0.75% – 1% of the property value. This fee is paid to the solicitor in the final settlement.

Real estate agency fees

The compensation paid to an agent for buying a property is generally 5% – 10%. This is dependent on the price of the sale and type of contract. The buyer agrees with the agent on a fee in advance and is included in the sales price.

Mortgage fees

The fees from the mortgage are generally around 1% of the borrowed amount of money for buying the villa/house/apartment.

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Portugal – Cheapest country in EU to go out for dinner.

The Lisbon and Cascais region not only has a rich history, beautiful nature and a great climate, the country is also best value for money in Europe (dinner wise). A three course meal for a family of 4, including coffee, coke and beer costs €52.79 on average in Portugal. In contrast, this would cost €137.12 in Italy.

According to a recent holiday price survey is Portugal the cheapest place in Europe to go out for dinner and drinks. Even countries like Spain and Greece can’t compete. These countries are respectively 17.5% and 26% more expensive than Portugal. In France one would pay €82.63 and in Florida €84.99 for a similar meal.

The survey was performed by the Post Office – Holiday Barometer Survey.

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Weather in Cascais

Cascais has throughout the year a comfortable climate for outdoor activities. Especially during the summer temperatures are great. The days are long, warm and the beaches are windy and therefore ideal for water sports.

The Guincho wind is a thermal wind, caused due to an extreme temperature difference between the sea and land creating a difference in pressure above the beach. This means that if there are clouds above the land the thermal effect will be less strong. During the summer months Cascais has lots of sun, ensuring a very strong wind almost every day! Not only kitesurfers and windsurfers enjoy these strong winds, also natorious sailing cups, such as the America’s Cup, have discovered the famous thermal winds of Cascais. This spectecular event is definately worth visiting. Rent your villa in Cascais in time!

Usually the wind is less strong at the golf courses located further from the sea. A gentle breeze will keep your round of golf pleasant though.

In the table below the temperature, rain, wind and wave averages are displayed.

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